Correlation Does Not Equal Causation

The first thing a student is generally taught, relative to cultivating a sound singing technique, is “how to breathe.” This makes him over-conscious of a function which should be explained and understood simultaneously with the development of his vocal registers. In the beginning, the limited development of the muscles of the vocal registers will not permit the student the complete range of dynamics of his breath power. An example of the interdependency between correct breathing and the development of the muscles of the registers can be understood when certain professional singers, after a long period of successful singing, show obvious difficulty in sustaining long vocal phrases. Surely they have not forgotten how to breathe? Logically then, the problem must be attributed to other factors. Frequently, the cause is some irregular function of the muscles of the vocal registers which do not allow those singers to utilize their breathing technique correctly.

 

Frisell, Anthony. The Tenor Voice: A Personal Guide to Acquiring a Superior Singing Technique. Branden Publishing Company, 2007.

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One thought on “Correlation Does Not Equal Causation

  1. One of my choral instructors is forever calling for placement. DRIVES ME CRAZY. This post about cause vs correlation triggered this question: What is one doing correctly (cause) that results in the placement-mask sensation (effect)? Is it solely registration (vibrator) (correct vocal fold adduction, length, tautness and thickness) or all that with a resonating tube? That may make for an interesting blog post.

    On Tue, Aug 5, 2014 at 12:01 PM, Petersen Voice Studio wrote:

    > Justin Petersen posted: “The first thing a student is generally > taught, relative to cultivating a sound singing technique, is “how to > breathe.” This makes him over-conscious of a function which should be > explained and understood simultaneously with the development of his vocal > re”

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